whytheology

For the Intersection of the Everyday and the Sacred

Sermon on the Kingdom of God

On Sunday I had the joy to preach at what I consider my “home church,” Louetta Road Baptist Church in Spring, TX (North Houston). I think this is one of the few ways I like topical preaching. I walked through a large portion of the bible to give the beginnings of a biblical theology of the Kingdom of God. Video is below:

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3 thoughts on “Sermon on the Kingdom of God

  1. Michelle on said:

    I enjoyed the sermon Trey! I am very interested in what you pointed out regarding the Sabbath Years from Leviticus 25. I’ve always wondered if those were celebrated. Do scholars believe they were not celebrated because they are not mentioned elsewhere in the OT or are there other records pointing to this ommission? Also – when you say that Jesus was born in what would be The Year of Jubilee, this would be 50 years from what point? I would be interested in more information on that timeline if you have a chance. Thank you!

    • In the prophets, when they ask why they are being sent into exile, the LORD responds by saying that because they have not celebrated the Sabbath rest (speaking of the Sabbath years where the land is fallow or unplanted), God was taking it (Ezekiel 20-23 is where it comes up the most). As far as Jesus being born on the year of Jubilee, the point I made in the sermon was the symbolic year of Jubilee Matthew is trying to point out by counting the generations. Yet some scholars (including NT Wright, whom I mention having used for some points in the sermon) argue that the “seventy sevens” as opposed to “seven sevens” that are mentioned in Daniel can be traced to having ended with the birth of Jesus or very near that time (i.e. 490 years from the time of the vision), where, again, God was saying that even if Israel went home before (which they did), they would still be in a sort of exile until the seventy sevens (sometimes translated seventy weeks) have been fulfilled. The reason I’m less sure is because these arguments are based upon the early Jewish counting of the years and there is some debate as to when the counting begins among them, and most Jewish people during that time frame would have been completely unaware of it (which is also why I didn’t go too in depth with it).

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